List of Top Ten Movies of 2022

ENTERTAINMENT
  1. The Banshees of Inisherin

The Banshees of Inisherin is a rare example of a film that simultaneously entertains and provides a fascinating examination of the human condition. On the surface, it tells the story of the day a man named Colm decided he was done talking to his friend Padraic. This makes the story very enjoyable. However, it is also a film that is purposefully set during the Irish Civil War, a conflict in which neighbors turned into enemies. Also, it’s a movie that makes people talk about how we affect the world around us.

  1. The Fablemans

Contrary to its advertising, The Fablemans is not a film that touts the magic of movies or calls them dreams in every way. Certainly, it depicts falling under a certain spell. The initial scenes, wherein a wide-peered toward young man is overpowered by a phony train wreck in what a large portion of us presently excuse as a messy Cecil B. DeMille film, present the defense that the dramatic experience used to be, despite everything can be, a tangible steamroller.

  1. Decision to Leave
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The Korean master Park Chan-wook uses a more muted palette and tone in ‘Decision to Leave,’ but it is just as gripping as his bold, adored works like the Oldboy. The filmmaker has made rapturous imagery, clever technology, a haunting score, and unexpected humor to steadily build tension in the movie.

  1. TAR

The film takes its time telling the story, but it’s as sparse as the stunning sets created by production designer Marco Bittner Rosser. There is no time wasted. In a story where tone and tempo are heavily influenced by what is heard, the score and sound design almost become characters in the film. With an audacious final scene that reverberates like the final note of a symphony, Taar is a captivating character who keeps our sympathies shifting as we consider questions of seduction, privilege, predation, and cancel culture.

  1. Aftersun

Aftersun, a semi-autobiographical film about a woman called Frankie Corio looking back on a vacation she took with her father in the 1990s, broke me open once more with regret. The movie is a deeply empathetic, visceral tale of the haunting heartache and vertiginous, inconsolable meaning that swims beneath one’s seemingly innocent memories, supported by riveting performances.

  1. Nope
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Jordan Peele’s third and most thematically ambitious film, proves his mastery of the dense blockbuster once more. Its fundamental understanding begins by placing us in the position of a terrified child actor who, before engaging in eye contact with his chimpanzee co-star Gordy, watches his co-star Gordy wreak havoc on the set of a sitcom.

  1. No Bears

In No Bears, the filmmaker Jafer Panahi tries to maintain the character’s freedom, to blur the lines that separate fiction from reality, and between the character and the world beyond. The title of the movie comes from a scene where a local villager explains that there are no bears near them.

  1. Everything Everywhere All at Once

In the movie, Evelyn and Waymond, owners of a Chinese-American laundry business, have a difficult marriage. Their struggle has an impact on Evelyn’s relationship with her adult daughter Joy, who wants her mother to accept Becky and her reactionary grandfather Gong Gong.

  1. RRR

The story of the movie is about two strangers, Ram Charan and N.T. Rama Rao Jr., who work together on the spot to save a child who is in danger by jumping simultaneously off a burning bridge and using a motorcycle, a horse, a long rope, a huge flag, and a long rope. RRR calls into question all of the other action scenes in all of the other movies. These scenes may have thrilling moments and impressive stunts, but they do not have the dazzling bravura of this show.

  1. Babylon
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Babylon takes the audience on a visceral journey through the highs and lows of Hollywood in the late 1920s, from joyful parties and chaotic film sets to personal triumphs and melancholy moments of complete despair.

Chazelle’s script is steeped in a deep knowledge of old Hollywood’s dark, complicated history and it has the most pervasive mythologies. With humor and sadness, Linus Sandgren’s fluid cinematography and Justin Hurwitz’s hot jazz score bring this huge era back to life.